Figures of Suppression

This week’s learning centred on figures of suspension. I’ve included a brief description of the five different categories of suspension below:

  1. Ellipsis: An element is continually missing and becomes obvious in its absence.
  2. Circumlocution: Part of object is left out but linked to another through similarity.
  3. Suspension: Part of the message is held back, not revealed immediately.
  4. Tautology: A word is repeated but used in a different sense, its second use attracts attention in its redundancy.
  5. Preterition: When an advertisement feigns a secret.

 

I’ve found an example demonstrating ellipsis below:

Charity Water Ad

In this example an element is continually left out in an obvious fashion. Here, as Durand states (Durand 1987) ‘…the reader must understand that something is missing… and then guess what is missing.’ In this case, even though the text reveals this missing element, the ad still acts as a riddle the viewer will take pleasure in solving (Hoeken, et. al 2009) by looking at the images first.

 Project 3 Progress:

At the moment I’ve been doing research into other advertisements looking at global warming. I’m also hoping to get started researching the issue in depth to determine which way I want to go when producing my posters.

 

Reference List

Charity Water (n.d.), ‘Water Changes Everything’ [image], Water Changes Everything, Pinterest, viewed 19th January 2016, https://www.pinterest.com/explore/charity-water/

Durand, J 1987, ‘Rhetorical Figures’, in J Umiker Seobeok (ed.), Marketing and Semiotics: New Directions in the Study of Signs for Sale, De Gruyeter, ePub, pp. 295-319.

Hoeken, H, Swanepoel, P, Saal, E, & Jansen, C 2009, ‘Using Message Form to Stimulate Conversations: The Case of Tropes’, Communication Theory (10503293), vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 49-65.

Advertisements

One thought on “Figures of Suppression

  1. Hey Ruby,
    Another awesome post, defining all of the figures of suppression succinctly (in such few words! I am jealous!). I love your example of ellipsis, its really cool play on how an element such as water is a significant player in many things we do every day (but obviously we take for granted). Its a powerful message and relies on first world viewers to understand that water is a luxury that is plentiful in our country. I enjoy your links to the independent research as well, they’ve been handy for me to then go and look further into to clarify my own knowledge. Much appreciated! Keep up the good work 🙂

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s