Week 10: Words at Work

This week we explored the idea of tone, and how it could be used as part of our brand identity, to reflect that values and goals of the brand.

We began by looking at some of the infamous ‘Mac vs PC’ ads from a little while ago. They are an interesting example because the tone is key to the success of these ads, and arguably to Apple’s success as well. My responses to the first activity are below:

1. What tonal values are evident in this campaign? How does this support Apple’s positioning?

  • Playful
  • Knowledgeable
  • Down-to-earth
  • Friendly
  • Simple

This supports Apple’s positioning by casting them as the best choice compared to PC. By presenting themselves this way they also suggest that PCs are not this way themselves. As these traits are desirable by most consumers who don’t know a lot about computers, they aim to make Macs seem like the right choice for the average consumer.

 2. How are these values being represented (tip: it is more than just visuals)?

They are represented visually by the appearance of the ‘Mac guy’ – he wears casual clothes, in contrast to the ‘PC guy’s’ stuffy, uptight clothes. In many of the ads the PC guy appears flustered and not in control of the situation, whereas the Mac guys is always calm and knows what’s going on.

Interestingly, they use the PC guy to explain most of the benefits of the Mac, as opposed to getting the Mac guy to say it himself. This is a sort of tongue-in-cheek way of saying that the PC knows it has competition, and knows that it is losing in most areas. By doing so, the Mac’s discussions tend to be simple and to the point, further emphasising the simplicity of the computers themselves.

We were then tasked with finding a couple of quotes/slogans from two different brands, one successful and one not as much. I actually found this difficult, surprisingly. With most brand taglines, particularly the big brands, we tend to become complacent in regards to their logo and slogan – it becomes familiar enough that we don’t question it. Interestingly, I think, this is the opposite effect of the slogan – it is meant to represent the brand, and that tone of voice a reflection of their values. However changing it to something else would most likely cause backlash rather than renewed interest, although this would also be a form of marketing, but I digress!

I chose to go with the LG slogan, and the Yellow Pages slogan.

LG logo_Pinterest_26_5_17

Yellow Pages_26_5_17

Both are pretty well known, and again, it’s a case of being so familiar with them that we don’t often stop to consider their meaning.

I chose the Yellow Pages slogan as a successful example of tone, and the LG slogan as the ‘bad’ example.

I feel the Yellow Pages ‘Let your fingers do the walking’ works well as a tone which reflects the brand. It reinforces the purpose of the product well, and is reflected perfectly in their logo. It also adds a bit of tongue-in-cheek humour that I think is intended to add a bit of interest to an otherwise quite boring product.

The LG slogan’s tone arguably doesn’t work quite as well. It doesn’t make immediate sense which confuses a lot of people upon reading it. While it does play on the brand’s abbreviation of LG, it doesn’t reflect what they sell, being namely electronic goods, so personally I don’t think it reflects the brand successfully.
Interestingly responses on BlackBoard that I’ve had suggest that they feel the LG slogan is more successful because it suggests feelings of happiness and comfort which using the products would induce. It’s interesting from a brand standpoint, that creating a slogan with the right tone is a difficult task because everyone will interpret it differently. I’ve had issues with this myself in creating the tagline for my own campaign – originally it was ‘Let’s End the W8 for Endo’ and feedback from others suggested that their first though was about losing weight rather than waiting for a diagnosis. This was eventually changed to ‘Don’t W8 to Know Endo’ which is far clearer in its tone, and has a stronger association with the purpose of the campaign than the original.

 

The second activity tasked us with looking first at our campaign’s competitors, and exploring the tones associated with each. Mine are below:

2_all-about-me_nzendo_11_5_17

All About Me:

  • Informative
  • Unique
  • Fun
  • Interactive

1_Endometriosis-worldwide-endomarch-2018_11_5_17

Worldwide Endo March:

  • Empowering
  • Positive
  • Supportive

3_Endo Active_11_5_17

Endo Active:

  • Empowering
  • Honest
  • Informative

4_jean-hailes-logo_jean hailes for womens health_11_5_17

Jean Hailes for Women’s Health:

  • Empowering
  • Informative
  • Inclusive
  • Supportive

    5_Endo Support_11_5_17

Endo Support:

  • Informative
  • Supportive
  • Inspirational

    6_Endo Warriors_facebook_11_5_17

Endo Warriors:

  • Supportive
  • Informative
  • Compassionate
  • Encouraging

    7_too long campaign_endometriosis uk_11_5_17

#TooLong:

  • Honest
  • Supportive
  • Encouraging
  • Determined

    9_pelvic-pain-foundation-logo_11_5_17

Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia:

  • Informative
  • Educational
  • Supportive
  • Understanding

 

From here, we then looked at out own campaign, and the tones we wanted to associate with it:

Don’t W8 to Know Endo

  • Informative
  • Honest
  • Supportive
  • Positive

The tone used is intended to provide information to young girls and their mothers, while explaining it to them in a way which is honest, without too much medical jargon, and speaks to them in a way which they can relate to. The aim is to focus on the positives – what sufferers can do to help themselves, and supportive – where they can get help, and what different types of help are available.
My positioning strategy was to aim the campaign at teenage girls specifically (and their mothers in the sister campaign), to be supportive and informative, empowering and simple to use/understand. I feel that these tonal values will be the best approach for this strategy, based on the gaps identified in the competitor analysis.

We chose three key words or phrases from our campaign that we felt reflected these values. I chose:

  • “Don’t W8 to Know Endo”
  • “Don’t forget there is a lot of help available, all you need to do is ask”
  • “General Info (just the basics)” “Specific Info (when you want to know more)”

Without context, other students had to guess our tonal values, to see how close they were to our perceived values. Fortunately, responses I got were pretty close to what I intended:
supportive, generous, caring, loving, genuine, casual, informal.
This is great because it lets me know I’m on the right track, and that my tone is being reflected in the materials I produce.

This week I’ve also been working hard to produce all the campaign materials for both the teen girls campaign and the mothers’ campaign. I’m pretty happy with what I’ve done so far, but would like to just fine tune everything, time permitting, in future.

brochure draft 2

mother brochure draft 1

mother campaign

poster draft 1

poster 2 draft

webpage draft 2

 

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Week 9: Choice

We explored the idea of choice this week in the learning materials, and I was able to use this to create a list of all the choices my campaign provides to the user, and then consider whether any of them could be removed, changed or streamlined to make their experience easier:

  • Do nothing
  • Look at website
    • Read general info
    • Read specific info
    • Read doctor recommendations
    • Access forum
    • Contact us
  • Ask doctor
    • Choose a doctor
    • Decide what to ask
  • Find out more (other source)
    • Google info
    • Choose a trusted source
    • Find other sources
  • Read pamphlet
    • Access website
    • Contact us
    • Access social media
  • Engage on social media
    • Choice of social media platform
    • How engaged they want to be (active participant or just read)
    • Share or not share information with others
  • Discuss with friends
    • Who to share with
    • How much to share
  • Discuss with family
    • Who to share with
    • How much to share

 

Are all of the choices necessary? Do the add or detract from the user experience? Are there any you can cut?

I feel as though these choices are necessary, but it will really depend on the individual to decide how much or little interaction they have with the campaign, therefore it is good to provide easy ways to interact. I feel as though the choices do add to the user experience, as I mentioned above, because it allows each user with a different need to access the campaign in a different way, and get something different out of it as required. This being said, there could potentially be a reduction of information – from general and specific, to info that covers the most important categories of information instead. This could help the user feel less overwhelmed when accessing the website, for example. I think streamlining the social media interaction could also work – reducing choices to one or two main platforms that teens are more likely to use.

 

Are the consequences of each choice presented clearly to the user? Have the consequences been made real?

I am hoping that I can make the consequences of doing nothing real to the user. This was never an intended choice for the campaign, but it is inevitable that some users won’t want to interact, so I feel it’s important to include. Conversely, I can’t find any real negative consequences to the other options provided, as any help the user chooses to seek will benefit them in the long run. Reiterating the benefits of seeking help will address this, making them seem real, and explaining how getting help could make their lives better.

 

Can you simplify the choices by categorising them in a manner that has meaning for the user?

Yes, I think that I could categorise the information provided on the website better, which would mean that the user could find info based on their reason for accessing the website, rather than having to look through many options before finding what they want.
Can you condition users to the decision-making process by starting with simple choices?

Yes, I think this would definitely help. I could start on the website by providing info based on “are you a sufferer?” or “do you want to know about endo or find out where to get help?” and then having a yes/no option to filter the information down until they get where they want to be. This would be particularly useful for teens to simplify the information, particularly as for many of them it may be their first experience with endometriosis and it could be otherwise overwhelming.

 

I found this and the pizza order activity really interesting, particularly as I hadn’t noticed there were so many choices available for what I considered a pretty standard campaign. I think that moving forward I’m going to be more conscious of the value of the choices that I provide to the user, and make sure that ultimately, they don’t “do nothing”.

Following this I began developing some of my campaign materials, beginning with the logo:

logo draft versions

At the moment I’m exploring the different variations of the logo, and hopefully I can refine this further. At the moment I am running with just the quote box seen on the right for the other campaign materials, with the ‘paper doll’ figures contributing graphically to the materials rather than in the logo.

Following this I worked on creating two posters based partly on these logos, using ideas which I thought were too busy for a logo, but could create a strong message when used on a poster:

both posters draft

They’re both in draft stages at the moment, but I feel like with a little tweaking they could become effective communication tools. These would be placed in high schools, with places such as the girls’ bathroom being the idea forum for them.

I then started working on a draft of the website. There are a lot of different pages to the site, so I’ve tried to just get the look and feel down pat, and then populate the other pages in the future:

webpage draft 1

Finally, I’ve begun working on a brochure aimed at teenage girls. This would again be distributed in high schools, in places such as the sick bay and offices, as well as being handed out during health education classes:

brochure draft 1

This uses a lot of the infographic content created for assessment 2, but the simplicity of it and the readability make it an ideal way to communicate to teens.

Next week I’m hoping to continue developing these materials, and refine what I do have based on feedback I recieve.

 

Week 8: Positioning

This week I’ve been working on getting up to date with everything as much as I can after moving house the past week, so this week’s post will include last week’s (week 7) work.

I began by working through the semiotics activities, and refreshing my knowledge of it after completing visual language a while ago. I then got to analyse a logo using semiotics, which you can see below:

amazon-com-logo

The signifiers here are the word Amazon and the graphic below.

The signified for this logo is reliant upon the graphic below. The curved shape has two implied meanings here: the first is that it resembles an arrow, pointing from the “A” in Amazon to the “Z”. As Amazon is an online retailer that delivers goods to the consumer, the implied meaning is that Amazon will get your purchase from A-Z, meaning they will bring it to you.

The second implied meaning here is that this graphic also resembles a smile, with the ‘arrow head’ mentioned previously acting as a dimple in the corner of the mouth. This is further emphasised by the slight upward curving of the z in line with this. This could represent that the customer will be happy with the service of Amazon, the quality of their product, or could even mean that service by Amazon is provided with a smile.

 

Following this, I worked on my own logo for the campaign using some of the theory explored:

logo

I think it still needs some tweaking after receiving feedback from another class members suggesting that some people might mistake the w8 for weight instead of the intended wait. I do like the play on words here though, so I may need to rephrase to get the message across as intended.

 

For this week’s work we’ve been looking at positioning, and how we might apply this to our own campaigns. We began by looking at a series of ads by iinet, and then analysing their positioning strategy and its success:

  1. What was iinet trying to achieve with these campaigns? Who was their target audience? Why?

They were trying to differentiate themselves from their main competitors – the big names in internet and phone providers. Their target audience was most likely a younger age group – 20s-40s. Their use of pop-culture references (i.e. Godzilla) and the more casual tone of the ads indicate that they want this group to see them as relatable, “cool” and ultimately a good alternative.

 

  1. How did they go about it? Was it successful?

 

They tried to achieve this by using the difference between “big” and “little” symbolically. For example, the small man in the big chair, as others have mentioned. The use of the Godzilla reference is clever because it is a physically big example, but also because Godzilla is typically seen as the bad-guy, in which instance, iinet could be the little men below trying to bring him down. They also paint the picture of the big companies as being inhuman, exemplified by the factory at the beginning of the second video, they are heartless machines that tell you what to do without ever listening to you. Conversely, iinet paints themselves as the down-to-earth approach, using the little human icons to represent the fact that they actually listen to you.

I think it is successful in achieving what they hoped. For people who feel disillusioned with the major competitors, they would feel like iinet is a company that will take them seriously and provide a better alternative.

 

  1. What elements from the positioning videos are evident in these campaigns?

The most obvious is their use of trying to bring down the name of the competitors in order to make themselves the better option, as mentioned above.

 

We were then asked to find a good example of positioning in advertising ourselves. I remember this ad from visual language a while ago, and remember thinking it was a clever take on competitive advertising:

coke vs pepsi ad_Pinterest_10_5_17

It takes the idea mentioned in the positioning video above about casting a negative light on the competition, but then results in a clever come back ad which turns the effect on it’s head. The Pepsi ad on the left is the original, and then Coke hit back with the ad on the right shortly after. I think the fact that Coke was able to spin a clever ad in its own right and make it have a completely different meaning than intended is a pretty great example of how positioning can be used to one’s advantage and another’s detriment, although both ads no doubt gained a lot of publicity, so perhaps it worked well for them both?

 

Following this, we were then tasked with creating our own positioning matrices based on competing campaigns and/or organisations. I’ve tried to include both well-known campaigns, and those that are less-known to get a good grasp of how the competition to my campaign is acting in this market:

positioning matrices

I’m hoping to use this data in my presentation for assessment 3, so I’m hoping it paints a really clear picture of where the market gaps are, and how they can be filled.

Next week I am going to begin collating the data I have and working on my document for assessment 3.

Week 6: Research

This week I’ve primarily been doing some more research on my issue, which is raising awareness of endometriosis in teen girls (15-20) and their mothers. 

I’ve also been working on the third persona as I work toward assessment task 2. With this persona, I’ve decided to go with a mother who has endometriosis, and suspects her daughter may have it. During my research, I’ve noticed this is quite common, actually more than I thought it would be. I feel like this is an important distinction from the previous mother persona because there is predetermined knowledge by the user already, so she may be looking for something more in-depth than a mother with no knowledge of endo would. She would most likely be looking for a guide to doctors and specialists in her area that her daughter can be referred to. As there is frustration and a lack of communication between her and the medical profession, she may seek the advice of other mothers rather than a medical professional, and so her experience with the campaign will be different than that of the other personas.

You can take a look at the persona below:

Persona 3_Mother 2

I’ve also made some notes of this week’s research below:

  • An American Endometriosis registry found that 38% of women started experiencing period pain before 15 years of age
  • A doctor should be consulted if pain:
  • Causes distress or inability to go to school or do other activities (sport, social events, etc.)
  • Occurs outside first 2 days of the period
  • Doesn’t get better when treatments like the pill or painkillers are taken
  • Between 67-73% of adolescents will have endometriosis when diagnostic surgery is performed
  • Women with a relative with endo have a higher chance of getting it themselves
  • Adolescents who start having periods earlier, and have a lower BMI have a higher risk
  • Keeping active rather than resting all day will reduce pelvic muscle spasm and pelvic pain
  • Gentle exercise such as walking or stretching will help
  • Bowel symptoms associated with endo can be relieved by improving diet. Drinking plenty of water, eating diets that contain lots of fibre or a low FODMAP diet can help
  • Finding enjoyable absorbing activities that distract from pain symptoms can improve symptoms
  • Mindfulness meditations can also focus the mind away from pain symptoms
  • Having a hot bath or a hot water bottle can help relax and improve symptoms
  • Acupuncture and alternative therapies can improve pain symptoms
  • Parents can get good info about pelvic pain to help their teen manage endo
  • As well as recognising the effects of pain on your daughter’s thoughts and emotions
  • Help your daughter develop a support team
  • Encourage her to go to school and maintain their social network
  • Shift the focus away from pain
  • Help her develop a plan to manage a bad pain day

Source: Hull L 2017, Adolescent Endometriosis, Endometriosis Australia, viewed 19th April 2017, < https://www.endometriosisaustralia.org/single-post/2017/04/11/Adolescent-Endometriosis>

  • All About Me is a secondary-school education program about endometriosis
  • The program is unique, interactive, fun, and designed to fit with school curriculum
  • 26% of girls aged 16-18 years are absent from school because of distressing symptoms relating to their period
  • Menstrual disorders in teenagers can have a significant physical, emotional and psychological impact on their health and seriously compromise schooling, quality of life and future fertility
  • The session is approximately 40-60 minutes, to fit with school timetable
  • Presenters are professionally trained
  • The program is suitable for students in years 10 -13 (14-18 year olds)
  • ENZ is a charity organisation
  • The program can be made available in any school throughout NZ, and can be transported worldwide with resources and training made available
  • Feedback: “me was cool because I didn’t know the difference between normal and not normal periods”
  • Feedback: “my sister found out she had endometriosis from looking at the pamphlet that was given out”
  • On request, ENZ can provide: ongoing support in schools if required
  • One on one counselling or advice to girls needing more help
  • Presentations to school staff, school nurses and parents
  • Age appropriate activities and workshops through its support networks

Source: NZEndo 2017, All About Me, NZEndo, viewed 18th April 2017, http://www.nzendo.org.nz/how-we-help/all-about-me

  • Mother of 16 year old
  • Desperate to know what to do about daughter’s bad periods
  • Daughter has at least 2 days of school off a month
  • Now having pains at other times
  • Her periods started at 12 and they have always been bad
  • Mother has a diagnosis of endo herself, was a battle to have treated and still suffers
  • Seeing her daughter heading down the same path is very upsetting
  • Have been to two GPs, story seems to be same – take pill and it will settle
  • Have tried that for several years and her periods are regular but the pain and other symptoms are still bad
  • Even when she is not on her period, she sill has awful pain
  • She’s frightened about going to the toilet now because it hurts so badly
  • Doctor has said she probably won’t get into the health system, and even if they do, nothing can be done and surgery never works
  • Mother is sure daughter has endo but doesn’t know what to do
  • No health insurance, can’t afford to see someone privately
  • Daughter spends most of her time at home where she used to be really outgoing and sporty
  • Doctor has put her on anti-depressants
  • Doctor responses below:
  • Try different medications
  • For muscle pain, keep moving and do stretches
  • It can be distressing for women with endo to see their daughters go through some of the same problems
  • There is no correct time to perform the first laparoscopy, but generally more conservative options are tried first in younger girls as this often works
  • If not, then laparoscopy at least gives an answer as to the way forward
  • Improving diet and exercise regimes can also help in this age group
  • All public hospitals should offer this service
  • Organisation response:
  • Endometriosis starts early, ignore it at our own peril
  • Her pain is showing signs of becoming persistent with other challenging symptoms
  • Developing a persistent pain condition at age sixteen must be taken seriously and managed effectively
  • Her symptoms are now affecting her mentally and socially as well as physically and emotionally
  • Recommend using a teenage menstrual diary to keep track of symptoms
  • Change to a GP who understands women’s health and pelvic pain
  • Ask for a referral to a gynaecologist who specialises in endometriosis
  • The letter from the GP must be quite specific and stress how her daughter’s life, well-being and schooling are compromised because of her symptoms
  • You can see a gynaecologist with expertise in treating endometriosis privately, and go on their public list which they can arrange for your daughter
  • Her pain also needs to be managed better
  • Exercise can be hard when miserable and in pain, but a daily walking routine is recommended
  • See if the school can guide and help
  • There may be a sports team she can join
  • Have an appointment with her school and in particular the dean of her year group
  • Falling behind in her studies or assignments can put further pressure on her and the more behind she gets, the worse things can become generally
  • Facebook members’ response:
  • “My doctor spent years telling me I was fine. I knew for a long time something was wrong, and thought it was endo.
  • “I use the public health systems and they made sure I was a psychologist, pain specialist, physio and gynae”
  • “I would recommend getting health insurance for her in case she has problems later in life
  • “You need to get her hormones levelled out so she doesn’t develop more and also to stop the pain”
  • “The continuous pain is concerning, would recommend a specialist gynae
  • “Not all GPs have a good understanding of endo – my previous GP thought I had appendicitis
  • “It is natural that young person would feel depressed when their body is out of control
  • “Talk closely with her about options to manage her feelings, particularly anxiety and self-esteem
  • “Her school guidance counsellor or nurse may be able to help with strategies to keep up with her school work and stay connected with friends
  • “Not getting on to adequate pain management and treatment can lead to psychological trauma
  • “The FODMAP diet can also help with pain relief, as well as regular gentle exercise and activities with a ‘flow’ element where you focus on something else instead of the pain”
  • “You have to shop around and find the doctor that you feel comfortable with and know is going to be of help to you and your daughter
  • “Other natural things that help for me are using heat packs, which sometimes help more than pain meds
  • “Keep active throughout the month with gentle exercise such as walking, yoga and swimming
  • “Support her and try and show her body love and care, even on the days when it is causing her pain”
  • “My advice would be a second opinion
  • “I have also been diagnosed with a gluten and dairy allergy on top of it, which apparently is common with endo patients”

Source: ENZ 2016, Ask ESIG September 2016, NZEndo, viewed 19th April 2017, http://www.nzendo.org.nz/media/65359/ask-esig-september-teenage-daughter.pdf

  • As a girl, Ms. Moncrieff read a magazine article about a disease called endometriosis and it “stuck” with her
  • She struggled through six years of fertility treatments
  • The condition is significantly underdiagnosed, prompting experts to launch an awareness program in South Australian schools
  • Based on a New Zealand model, it will help teenage girls recognise the symptoms earlier and cut the average eight year wait for a diagnosis
  • Evans said helping girls to “recognise when pain isn’t normal is the best way of avoiding the severe problems that endometriosis can cause”
  • Endometriosis NZ CEO Deborah Bush said “if girls were experiencing severe pain as they entered puberty it was important to consider that it could be endometriosis”
  • Delays in diagnosis often occur because symptoms are mistaken for digestive complaints or downplayed as “normal” period pain
  • Tschirpig first experienced symptoms in 2011 aged 15, but was not referred to a specialist until 2016
  • Tschirpig: “I had started to believe that it might be in my head, until I was admitted to hospital two times in a month”
  • O’Brien: “during flare ups” she found it hard to walk or sit without pain

Source: Novak, L. 2017, ‘Endometriosis Program Coming to SA Schools to Help School Girls Recognise Signs of the Painful Condition’, The Advertiser, viewed 18th April 2017, http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/lifestyle/health/endometriosis-program-coming-to-sa-to-help-school-girls-recognise-signs-of-the-painful-condition/news-story/0454b857adf6cb53b73607a1a249e09b?nk=88b75d15bb97442f6edf1f39ee57a974-1492484365

  • 1 in 5 teenage girls suffer pain with periods
  • A study of 1000 Australian girls aged 16-18 found that while 93% had pain of some kind with a period, 21% experienced severe pain, and 26% had missed school with periods, either for pain or a mix of other conditions including heavy bleeding
  • Most common cause of pelvic pain in teenagers is endometriosis
  • Symptoms of endo can begin from a girl’s first menstrual period
  • Dysmenorrhea (period pain) and menorrhagia (heavy bleeding) most common problems
  • Pain which causes distress is never normal
  • Left untreated, these symptoms can severely affect a young woman’s quality of life, relationships with friends and family, schooling and potentially their future fertility
  • Other symptoms can include lower back pain, pain down legs, pelvic muscle pain, headache, irritable bowel, fatigue and pain through the month

Source: Pelvic Pain Foundation 2016, Pelvic Pain in Teens, Pelvic Pain Foundation, viewed 19th April 2017, http://www.pelvicpain.org.au/information/teens/pelvic-pain-teens/

  • It is an old myth that teenagers do not get endometriosis
  • Up to two thirds of women with endometriosis have symptoms before they are 20 years old
  • This means symptoms in teenage girls need to be taken very seriously
  • If you are a teenager and have menstrual pain to the extent that it keeps you away from school, or it prevents you from participating in day-to-day activities, then you should discuss your symptoms with your doctor
  • Prepare a tick-list for the appointment
  • Note all symptoms, when they occur and how often
  • You may want to bring a friend or family member to the initial consult
  • Do not be afraid of asking questions
  • The treatment options do not vary that much whether you are a teenager, or a woman in her 20s, 30s or 40s
  • As with any treatment, the key component is what is appropriate for your symptoms, and that you are comfortable with the therapy you are undergoing

Source: Hummelshoj L 2017, Teenagers and Endometriosis, Endometriosis.org, viewed 18th April 2017, http://endometriosis.org/resources/articles/teenagers/

  • Having a child with pain means change for all the family and you may feel ill-equipped to handle these changes
  • Get good information about persistent pain so you understand the situation
  • Help your child live as normally as possible. Keep up family routines, encourage your child to do their share and be involved in family activities
  • Help your child develop a good support team around them, including you, your family, their friends, their school and their GP and other health care professionals
  • Shift the focus away from pain. Acknowledge pain is present but also encourage child to engage in helpful pain management strategies such as getting involved in a favourite activity, using humour, music, dance, art, meditation, etc.
  • Recognise the effects persistent pain has on your child’s thoughts and emotions
  • Anxiety and depression are common, sometimes anger or fear, unhelpful thoughts and worrying. All of these can make your child’s pain seem worse
  • Get professional help from GP, psychologist or counsellor to make a difference
  • Encourage your child to go to school every day.
  • Getting behind in school and losing friends can add more stress and cause problems in the long term.
  • You may need to work with your child’s teachers to make a pain management plan for school, which may include giving medication, limited time-out or rest periods, and modified physical activities, as well as sending work home for days your child can’t get to school
  • Don’t’ rely only on medication to manage pain. Sometimes a number of treatments need to be tried before a suitable one or combination is found
  • Discourage resting in bed or on the couch for long periods of the day. It may reduce pain short term but it causes problems with sleeping at night which makes pain harder to manage the next day. If this goes on for a long time, your child will become run down, develop a sleep disorder, and have even more fatigue and pain
  • Help you child learn useful, active ways to manage their pain.
  • Encourage them to do activities they value and enjoy despite being in pain, including a gentle exercise program
  • A physiotherapist or exercise physiologist can help with a graded exercise program
  • Help your child develop a plan for a bad-pain day
  • Planning ahead can help them worry less about pain flare-ups and manage the pain better

Source: Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia 2016, Tips for Parents of Teens with Pain, Pelvic Pain Foundation of Australia, viewed 19th April 2017, http://www.pelvicpain.org.au/information/teens/tips-parents-teens-pain/

The information above is valuable for a couple of reasons. The first is that there are a few different perspectives provided here – both that of the sufferer herself, and that of the parent. This helps provide context to the issue, and helps me to explore how I can address these issues in my campaign, based on how a teenager feels, and how a mother feels. The second is there are some good examples of educational materials which can inform the content provided in the campaign. The information provided to mothers of teens with endo, for example, approaches it from a different perspective than materials which communicate to a teenager. For example, in the Pelvic Pain Foundation article above, there is an emphasis on encouragement of maintaining routines and establishing a support network for their daughter, whereas the All About Me article emphasises basic education for teens in a setting which is aimed at reaching that age group.

This information will help me going forward in determining how to reach each target market, and will help me develop personas which accurately reflect the girls and women who are in the midst of dealing with endometriosis.

 

I’ve also conducted an interview with mum, to gain some perspective about how the mother of an endo sufferer might feel:

Interview

This has been interesting, because it reveals some qualitative data that might be able to inform the tone of voice used in the campaign. Other research from a similar view point shows some similar views, so this will definitely be able to help inform my design.

Topic Overview

As requested, I’m including my updated topic selection, as well as target markets and the goals of the design process:

 

The topic / issue:

Raising awareness of endometriosis in adolescent girls (15-20)

Specific problem I am addressing with this campaign:

The average 8 year wait time for a diagnosis.

Specific target market I will be aiming my campaign at:

Adolescent girls with symptoms of endometriosis who might not know anything is wrong; mothers of adolescent girls who have symptoms of endometriosis.

The change of behaviour my campaign is aiming to evoke:

By raising awareness of the issue, the hope is that girls will seek medical help for their issues, or at least share their concerns with their parents. In mothers, the aim is to get them to recongnise the symptoms of endo, and potentially arrange medical help for their daughters if they think they might have the condition.

How the actions / the change of behaviour will make an impact on the issue / problem: 

On a general level, greater awareness will allow the 8 year wait for diagnosis to be reduced as more people know about the problem. On a personal level, the sooner a woman is diagnosed and treatment begins, there is less chance of it having a serious and lasting impact.

Week 4: Workbook Submission

This week I’ve been focused on completing my interim submission for assignment 1: my workbook process journal.

This has involved creating a designed document that contains all of my research thus far, including personas, sketches, mood boards and statistics which are important to the target markets.

In preparation for this, I’ve also completed another persona, this time for the mother of a teenage girl. You can see this below:

Persona 2_Mother.indd

Persona 2_Mother2

This persona was trickier for me to complete, as it relied largely on anecdotal evidence rather than pure statistics. In saying this, however, researching how mothers connect with media and with other mothers has been important to ascertain, as this will determine how I deliver a campaign which is targeted to mothers. A lot of the anecdotal evidence deals with how mothers of daughters with endo can deal with the trials that come with it; as well as looking at how sufferers’ mothers treated their condition through their own eyes. While these are two different perspectives, I feel that they work to create a detailed persona of a mother that doesn’t know about endo, but is trying to deal with their daughters’ symptoms as best they can.

Also completed this week was a small campaign moodboard, which looks at other campaigns run for endo, both by Endometriosis Australia and other organisations. The result is below:

Campaign Reference Image

I really like the strong motivational themes to the posters, which focus on knowledge and empowerment rather than fear and unknowing. Appealing to girls in this way is, I think, far more likely to reach them than a purely fact-based or scare-tactic campaign would. I also like the use of the yellow throughout the campaigns, with this being the official colour of the yellow ribbon which signifies endometriosis awareness.

Finally, I’ve also started to refine my sketches based on feedback from my peers:

sketch_wk4

I’ve used the paper chain graphic from one sketch, and the end/endo slogan from another, and I’m now hoping to ascertain a way to use both together for the final design. I’m unsure whether this will target teens or their mothers yet, nor of the delivery method, but I feel as though this could create a strong message for communication.

Week 3: Research

Following on from the sketching activity I completed yesterday, I’ve spent today doing some more research which I hope I can use to inform my personas which I’m hoping to work on again next week.

I’ve been looking this week more at mothers of teen girls with endometriosis, which is my second main target group. I’ve also been trying to use the ABS website and other government sources such as the ACMA to see how mothers and women in the general age group of being the mother to a teen are using the internet, what they are using it for, and how they are using  it. This is hopefully to try and refine the way I deliver the campaign so that it can reach them as well as their daughters.

Some research notes are below:

  • 70% of mums now own smartphones
  • They have access to online tools, and use them to fight feelings of isolation and maintain relationships
  • The rise of Facebook, Twitter and blogs has given mums a place to congregate, share opinions and build friendships
  • Good ads have ‘themes of sentimentality’ also ‘humor’ and ‘depiction of mum as a do-it-all badass’
  • Keep it (ads) brief
  • Mums appreciate and value efficiency
  • Make it snappy and useful
  • Appreciate the diversity of mums
  • ‘Be Real’
  • Mothers appreciate honesty and realism in communications
  • Social media connects mums (and mum bloggers)
  • Facebook is the social media platform where mums tend to spend the most time
  • Facebook is best for a mainstream audience
  • Twitter targets a more affluent, tech-savvy mum
  • ‘Anything that comes from brands is inherently bias’
  • If they hear it from another mum, they are more compelled to purchase
  • ‘mummy bloggers’ can be a great tool for doing so
  • Focus on having a conversation and building a relationship

Source: Drell, L 2011, ‘7 Tips for Marketing to Moms’, Mashable, 29 December, viewed 30th March 2017, http://mashable.com/2011/12/29/marketing-to-moms/#GtKJJVBY7Eqk

  • Mothers are more likely to look at health and medical information (49% more likely) than average smartphone users
  • Brands should take a more targeted approach when advertising to this market

Source: Clark, J 2015, ‘Australian Mother’s Smartphone Habits Revealed’, Marketing Magazine, 13th May, viewed 30th December 2017, https://www.marketingmag.com.au/news-c/australian-mothers-smartphone-habits-revealed/

  • Facebook groups for mothers are overtaking traditional playgroups as a source of trusted advice
  • Word-of-mouth in mothers’ groups and communities had fast become a major influence in mothers’ buying habits
  • Mothers’ primary source of sharing information used to be face-to-face at mums’ groups or playgroups but now virtual communities are growing in popularity
  • ‘mothers trust mothers’
  • Mothers tend to trust the opinions of other mothers when they recommend a product
  • There is siginificant strength of these non-face-to-face opinions in mothers’ groups and communities
  • Repeated interactions with the community and the accumulation of trust make the effect stronger still
  • The effect is strongest among mothers with the same number of children who are similar ages
  • Recommendations from other mothers are more powerful than any other structured promotion

Source: Pash, C 2014, ‘Australian Mums Trust Other Mums on Social Media: Study’, Business Insider, August 22nd, viewed 30th March 2017, https://www.businessinsider.com.au/australian-mums-trust-other-mums-on-social-media-study-2014-8

  • Traditional devices (laptop and desktop computers) are most often used to access the internet
  • Almost a quarter (22%) of online Australians used a mobile phone as their main device
  • 12% nominated a tablet as their main device
  • In 45-45 age group, laptops were the devices used most often to access the internet (33%)
  • Use of internet varies by age in 18-44 age group, 100% used the internet, compared to 94% of those aged 45-64
  • People aged 18-34 are much more likely to use a mobile phone to access the internet (94%)
  • Those aged 35-44 used a tablet more than any other age group (65%)
  • 88% of online Australians engaged in online communications activities, including email, instant messaging, phone and video calls made via the internet
  • Participation in online communities and blogs also increased significantly – rising 10 percentage points to 54% of online Australians
  • 79% of Australians used the internet for research and information
  • 54% used the internet for blogs and online communities

Source: ACMA 2015, ‘Report 1 – Australians’ Digital Lives’, Communications Report 2013-14 Series, Australian Communications and Media Authority, viewed 30th March 2017, http://www.acma.gov.au/~/media/Research%20and%20Analysis/Publication/Comms%20Report%202013%2014/PDF/Communications%20report%20201314_LOW-RES%20FOR%20WEB%20pdf.pdf

  • Studies suggest that between 5-10% of menstruating women in Australia are affected by Endometriosis
  • Most women who have been diagnosed with endometriosis report that their symptoms started during adolescence
  • Adolescents are more likely to have lesions that are clear or red in colour and because of this they are sometimes harder to detect
  • It can be difficult for adolescents to distinguish between what is normal period pain and what is something more serious as they are still getting used to their periods
  • The have little means of comparison
  • Indicators that pain being experienced is not normal:
  • If pain is occurring more than on the first 1-2 days of period
  • If pain cannot be effectively managed with the use of antiprostaglandins or oral contraceptives
  • If the pain worsens over time
  • Having a family member with endometriosis increases the chances of also having the condition
  • Some parents may be reluctant for their daughters to go on the pill, fearing that it will encourage them to become sexually active earlier
  • They may also have concerns about exposing them to hormonal drugs at such a young age
  • Parents may find it helpful to think of the pill as just a medication that assists with endometriosis rather than a contraceptive, as in this case it is not being prescribed for contractive purposes
  • Gentle exercise can play an important role in pain management
  • Exercise can combat pain and alleviate feelings of depression and stress which can be common in those experiencing pain
  • Types of exercise that are suitable include walking and swimming
  • Period pain in adolescents should not be ignored or considered simply part of becoming a woman
  • If left untreated endometriosis can lead to long term consequences such as adhesions, fertility problems as well as emotional and mental health issues

Source: Braun, K 2015, ‘Endometriosis in Adolescence’, Women’s Health Queensland Wide, viewed 30th March 2017, http://womhealth.org.au/print/conditions-and-treatments/endometriosis

  • One in ten women affected by endometriosis, chances are you know a woman who has it
  • It takes an average of 7-10 years to diagnose
  • Experts call disease ‘silent epidemic’
  • Sufferer may not even know she has it
  • Sufferers will ‘almost certainly be forced to become a self-taught expert on the incurable disease’
  • Women with endometriosis cannot receive a complete treatment from one doctor because of its “complicated maze of symptoms” including pelvic pain, heavy or irregular periods, bowel and bladder symptoms and fertility problems
  • ‘it’s up to women to learn themselves to recognise what is happening
  • But it is very hard for a lot of women to learn all that by themselves
  • A lack of public awareness means women are falling through the cracks
  • Many women have never heard of endometriosis
  • Some think their symptoms are “just part of being a woman”
  • Doctors are also unfamiliar with the disease, they may not recognise it in patients, leading to a delay in diagnosis
  • Most emergency department staff do not recognise the symptoms, and women are left “dissatisfied, with no explanation and a lot of embarrassment and fear
  • The health system “appears to be oblivious to their suffering”
  • “There is very little awareness or understanding in the community or in places where you would expect to find it – educational institutions, hospitals, ambulance services and general practice”
  • Endometriosis is as common as Asthma or Diabetes, but is allocated only a fraction of the millions of dollars they receive each year in research funding
  • Last year, the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) allocated more than $14.7 million to asthma research and $64.1 million to diabetes research, but only $837,433 was allocated to endometriosis research
  • The NHMRC funded a single grant application for endometriosis research in 2016
  • Low awareness is one of the reasons for lack of funding

Source: Perrott, K 2017, ‘Endometriosis: Health System “Oblivious to Suffering” of One in Ten Women Affected by “Silent Epidemic”, ABC News, 24th March, viewed 30th March 2017,< http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-24/endometriosis-health-system-oblivious-to-suffering-of-women/8331534

  • it can be helpful for you as a parent/guardian to think about the pain in two ways: the physical pain your daughter experiences and how it impacts both her life and that of the entire family.
  • Your daughter’s physical pain may include ongoing pelvic pain, painful periods, and less often, bowel and bladder problems.
  • How this pain impacts her life may include challenges such as: isolation from friends due to unexpected bouts of physical pain, not being able to participate in sports or other activities (because of chronic pain and/or fatigue), and anxiety over school work (because of absences).
  • Her chronic pain can take a toll on family members and other important people in her life, causing added tension and stress.
  • both you and your daughter may feel frustrated because her health feels out of your control.
  • Learning to manage life stress is essential when you are living with someone who experiences chronic pain.
  • Many young women with endometriosis feel overwhelmed with managing both their pain and their stress.
  • You may feel overwhelmed at times, too.
  • You can encourage your daughter to effectively manage her stress by helping her incorporate the following techniques into her daily life:
  • Exercising
  • Sleeping 8–9 hours each night
  • Taking naps when needed
  • Meditate daily
  • Eating 3 healthy meals a day with nutritious snacks in between
  • Doing things she enjoys when she feels well
  • Staying in touch with her friends in person, by phone, or online
  • Keeping up with her schoolwork (so she doesn’t feel overwhelmed or get behind) Learning yoga
  • Learning when to push herself and when not to
  • Keeping to routines as much as possible
  • Planning ahead with her for unexpected “flair–ups” of pain
  • Talking to a counsellor
  • develop her own personalized list of things to do when she is experiencing a pain flare–up.
  • It’s important that this be HER list of techniques that she finds useful and accessible when she needs it
  • Managing pelvic pain at school:
  • Know her pain tolerance threshold.
  • Talk with your daughter about what she can tolerate in school and what she simply cannot manage.
  • Urge her to communicate with close friends and how they can be supportive
  • With your daughter, identify an adult contact person at school. whom you both feel comfortable sharing your daughter’s endometriosis history, and who can be supportive and available during the school day.
  • Share information about endometriosis only with your daughter’s permission with the contact person, as well as teachers, school nurse, coaches, and friends.
  • Make a plan for pain at school. Talk with the school nurse and find out if there is a place at school where she can lie down if she has severe pain.
  • Urge your daughter to identify a person in each class (friend or teacher) who will e–mail her the homework assignment if she misses class.
  • Make sure your daughter has enough time in the morning to get ready for school. She may need to wake up earlier.
  • Don’t assume that every day your daughter wakes up in pain means that she has to stay home from school, or that the day is “lost to pain.” She should go to school every day even if she has some pain in the morning. It may be that her pain will get better or go away once she gets moving and is distracted. If her pain becomes unmanageable later in the day, she will have the option of getting dismissed.
  • Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is essential for all teenagers. Your daughter should eat nutritious meals and healthy snacks and get at least 8–9 hours of sleep every night. She should also try to do some kind of physical activity every day, regardless of the pain. Activities could include, walking, riding her bike, dancing, playing a sport, etc.
  • Do your best to help your daughter stay on top of her schoolwork. If she needs extra help with a particular subject(s), she should talk with her teacher before the school work piles up.
  • It’s necessary for your daughter to keep in touch with her friends. She should try to talk to at least one friend every day either on the phone, via text messages, e–mail, or on a social networking site. She will feel less isolated and it will be easier for her when she returns to school.
  • Be proactive. Encourage your daughter to make a list of things she can do to manage her pelvic pain at school. Offer your help with any tasks that would benefit from adult assistance.
  • Managing activities, friendships, and chronic pain:
  • living with chronic pain can impact all areas of a person’s life, even those areas that are typically fun and enjoyable.
  • Your daughter’s pain from endometriosis can sometimes get in the way of being able to do things with friends both on a daily basis and for special events
  • Her friends, family, coaches and teachers may appear frustrated and discouraged when her pain causes her to decline social invitations or when she appears to avoid activities.
  • Your daughter may even worry about canceling plans too many times with her friends or not being a “good friend”.
  • Suggest that your daughter be in touch with at least one person outside of your family every day.
  • Encourage your daughter to organize activities that can be held at your house if it’s more comfortable for her to be at home
  • Make sure her close friends, coaches or activity directors understand that her pain is a real medical condition. Educate them.
  • If she does have to cancel with friends or family, or either of you realize she can’t participate in an activity as planned, try to take it in stride: explain promptly, offer alternative options, and help her to take care of the pain.
  • Complementary therapies for pain management: Some young women are helped by surgery, some by medication, and some with a combination of both. Adding complementary therapies to traditional treatment helps manage their pelvic pain more effectively.
  • Activities such as yoga, acupuncture and massage therapies can all help

Source: Centre for Young Women’s Health 2016, ‘Endometriosis for Parents: Helping Your Daughter Cope With Pain, Center for Young Women’s Health, 29th August, viewed 30th March 2017, http://youngwomenshealth.org/parents/endometriosis-helping-your-daughter-cope-with-pain/

The information I’ve found above will be useful in a few different ways. The marketing information will obviously, as above, help me specify the medium for the campaign. I think it will be beneficial to look at a website and social media campaign to appeal to mothers based on this information.

The second is the general information that describes the condition, as it identifies the lack of knowledge by multiple parties, including the patient themselves, and the feelings that sufferers often have associated with that. The facts and figures will be an important part of the information provided as part of the campaign.

Finally, the information which is targeted specifically at mothers of endo sufferers is very useful for determining what mothers need, what knowledge they might have or be lacking in, as well as some really practical tips that could help reduce the overwhelmed feeling many mothers of endo sufferers experience. This will also be really important information to include as part of the campaign, and will help inform the personas which represent mothers of teens wtih endo or endo symptoms.

That’s all for this week! Next week I’m hoping to have more persona documents done, and continue researching as much as I can. Let me know if you have any questions or comments!